Abstract

Aqueous Extract of Psidium cattleianum as Intracanal Medication: An In Vitro Study of Cell Viability

Psidium cattleianum extract has shown activity against oral microorganisms and anti-inflammatory activity, and also tissue biocompatibility. These characteristics aroused interest in its use as an alternative to traditional intracanal medication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the aqueous extract of P. cattleianum cytotoxicity by structural and functional cell viability, in order to use as intracanal medication. The hypothesis is that aqueous extract of P. cattleianum should be used as intracanal medications due to better cytotoxicity response than cell culture medium. Positive control used was RPMI cell culture medium and negative control was water. Cell viability was analyzed after 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 10 h and 24 h of incubation by exclusion method with trypan blue and MTT assay, using human mononuclear cells (PBMC) and human Periodontal Ligament Cells (PDL) in culture. By trypan blue assay, both PBMC and PDL cells showed an average viability higher (p>0.05) than RPMI when the cells were maintained in aqueous extract. Distilled water showed lowest average viability (p<0.05). By MTT assay, PDL cells showed increasing viability over time when maintained in aqueous extract culture. P. cattleianum was able to maintain the structural and functional cell viability, shoeing a higher performance than positive control. Also, this extract neutralized the detrimental effect of distillated water. The results about biocompatibility assays are promising to indicate the use of aqueous extract of P. cattleianum as an alternative to traditional intracanal medications.


Author(s):

Christine Men Martins, Thayse Yumi Hosida, Ana Maria Sell, Eloi Dezan Junior and Mirian Marubayashi Hidalgo



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  • Directory of Research Journal Indexing (DRJI)
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  • Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research